LAST TOURS

ETH Seminar Week
Tehran_ Isfahan
21._30. October 2011
Prof.Andrea Deplazes

Is there really the typical oriental or islamic city? What are the special features of this city and where are the advantages and disadvantages of their particularities? What are the urban planning rules and planning principles of this kind urban development? What qualities of our cities do we find in the Oriental-Islamic? What are the interactions between the cities in Occident and Orient or the Islamic countries today? And finally, what can one learn from these interactions? These and similar questions are at the center of the seminar week “Tehran – Isfahan: The Oriental City”, in which it is about understanding and considering fundamental urban planning problems

Trip with Federal Swiss Architects The Oriental Towns: Tehran, Kerman, Yazd, Isfahan 11._22. September 2013 By Federation of Swiss Architects; BSA Zurich In Cooperation with Thomas Meyer-Wieser

Is there really the typical oriental or islamic city? What are the special features of this city and where are the advantages and disadvantages of their particularities? What are the urban planning rules and planning principles of this kind urban development? What qualities of our cities do we find in the Oriental-Islamic? What are the interactions between the cities in Occident and Orient or the Islamic countries today? And finally, what can one learn from these interactions? These and similar questions are at the center of the seminar week “Tehran – Isfahan: The Oriental City”, in which it is about understanding and considering fundamental urban planning problems

Study Trip Rietberg-Museum, Swiss The Oriental Town: Tehran – Isfahan 01._11. May 2014​

With a city history that dates back to the third millennium BC. goes back, the Orient has the oldest urban culture on earth. This was from 622 by the spread of Islam as well as in the second half of the 19th century, it was transformed by the process of “westernization” and developed into an independent city type. Therefore, today’s Islamic-Oriental city exists from a variety of inner-city centers and cores of various forms and functions, which we want to decode on the basis of the cities, Isfahan and Tehran on various thematic city walks.

Educational Trip with Architecture & Culture, SIA, Swiss The Way to Isfahan, the Islamic-Oriental City 19._31. October 2014 By A&K Professional Association of the SIA In Cooperation with Thomas Meyer-Wieser
With a city history that dates back to the third millennium BC., the Orient has the oldest urban culture on the earth. This was transformed from 622 by the spread of Islam and in the second half of the 19th century through the process of “Westernization” and developed into a separate city type. Therefore, today’s Islamic-Oriental city consists of a multitude of inner-urban centers of various forms and functions, which we want to decode on the basis of the a&k study tour.
Educational Trip with Austrian Architects, TU Vienna The oriental city and its gardens and Landscapes: Tehran, Kerman, Yazd, Isfahan 07._18. April 2015 In Cooperation with Stadt
Iran is one of the most culturally rich countries in the world. Over the millennia, the most diverse cultures, from the Sassanids to the Mongols to the Qajars, have shaped the country. All cultures left their cultural and architectural traces. On our journey we will get to know and decipher the different historical nuclei of the Islamic-Oriental city in the cities of Tehran, Kerman, Yazd and Isfahan. On different thematic city walks we follow the development of the city in Teheran and Isfahan, starting with the original urban structure of the buildings of the Safavidian high – bloom under Shāh Abbās I., over their development under the Qajaren (Kajar) and the modernization of the 1950er years up to the the modern metropolises. Accompanying we learn the gardens and landscapes of the cities know, i.a. the prince garden Bagh-e Shazadeh or the desert Dasht-e Lut.
ETH Seminar Week Isfahan 12._18. March 2016 By Prof. Adam Caruso,Chair of Architecture And Construction In Cooperation with Thomas Meyer-Wieser ​
With a city and garden history dating back to the third millennium, the Orient has one of the oldest urban and garden cultures on earth. Many cities were built from 622 AD. In the second half of the nineteenth century, it was transformed by the spread of Islam through the process of “Westernization”, and independent types of cities developed. This explains why today’s Islamic-Oriental city is made of a variety inner-urban centers of various forms and functions. The journey begins with Shiraz, City of Gardens, with the unique ruins of the Achaemenid capital of Persepolis and the tomb of Cyrus II in Passargade (6th century BC). Then you visit Isfahan “nesf-e jahan: half of the world”, which is considered the pearl of Iranian cities with its beautiful square, palace, mosque and gardens.
Educational Trip with Swiss Architects Iran: The Oriental Cities: Isfahan – Tehran 07._22. May 2016

With a city history that dates back to the third millennium BC., the Orient has the oldest urban culture on earth. This was transformed from 622 by the expansion of Islam and in the second half of the 19th century through the process of “Westernization” and developed into a separate city type. Therefore, today’s Islamic-Oriental city consists of a variety of inner-city centers of various forms and functions, which we want to decode on the basis of the cities of Shiraz, Yazd, Isfahan and Tehran on various thematic city walks.

Educational Trip with Swiss Architects Iran: Safavid Dynasty to Iran Revolution: Tabriz – Tehran 22. October_06. November 2016

The journey takes us to the origins of the Safavids, the first capitals of the empire: Tabriz and Qazvin. Then we explore Isfahan from the pre-Safavid city to the capital of Shah Abbas the Great. With the collapse of the Safavid Empire, Karim Khan Zand Shiraz built his residence city, whose famous gardens we visit. In 1789, the Qajarenfürst Aqa Mohammed Khan Tehran to the Shah residence. In 1925, Reza Khan became a Shah. The Pahlavis transformed Teheran into a global city with explosive growth. In 1979, the Shah had to flee the country. Khomeini landed in Teheran and founded the Islamic Republic, to which we dedicate the last round tours.

Iran: Safavid Dynasty to Iran Revolution: Tabriz – Tehran 22. April_07. May 2017 NZZ Reisen​

The journey takes us to the origins of the Safavids, the first capitals of the empire: Tabriz and Qazvin. Then we explore Isfahan from the pre-Safavid city to the capital of Shah Abbas the Great. With the collapse of the Safavid Empire, Karim Khan Zand Shiraz built his residence city, whose famous gardens we visit. In 1789, the Qajarenfürst Aqa Mohammed Khan Tehran to the Shah residence. In 1925, Reza Khan became a Shah. The Pahlavis transformed Teheran into a global city with explosive growth. In 1979, the Shah had to flee the country. Khomeini landed in Teheran and founded the Islamic Republic, to which we dedicate the last round tours.

Educational Trip with Swiss Architects In the footsteps of the Shah Abbad the Great 07. _21. May 2017

In March 1598, Shah Abbas traveled from Qazwin to Isfahan to celebrate the Persian New Year. In a flash of inspiration, he decided to found his own imperial city on the gardens and fields between the famous city and the shores of Zayandeh-Rud. The master plan of Shah Abbas represents the vision of a new order articulating the concept of royalty on the basis of Twelver Shia and blending the glories of the ancient Persian kings with the legitimacy of the Prophet’s family. The Ensemble of the Meydan, with its axial juxtaposition of religion, politics, economy and legitimacy transformed the medieval city into an icon of absolutist power. Together with the Chaharbagh promenade and the planned residential districts of the elite, a real capital and one of the most populous and prosperous cities of the 17th century emerged, in which the diverse strands of absolutism and centralism are visually and spatially tangible.

Educational Trip with Austrian & Swiss Architects “Garden as Image of Paradises” cooperation with Th. Meyer-Wieser 31. March_14. April 2018

In the large plains, east of the Zagros Mountains, lie the remains of the earliest garden, of which there is written tradition. 2500 years ago, Cyrus the Great created a garden here that can still be read today with its four-part layout and gives us an insight into the origin of the Persian garden. Both the architecture and the plants, streams and shady pavilions formed a kind of model for later garden developments. The image of the framed, lifted, refined, to a geometric “mandala” nature in which the prince could represent and enjoy his power as a reflection of the great creation, so had to entice even the Muslim rulers. The early conceptions of a garden as a paradise were of crucial importance to the history of the Islamic garden, which radiated eastwards to India and became equally influential to the European Renaissance garden and other gardens of Western culture. During this trip, we try to “give a face to the history of the country,” locate dates and events, read cities, and reconstruct the main venues.

From the Safavids to the Iranian Revolution Friday 05. to Sunday 21. October, 2018 By Volkshochule Zurich

The rise of the Safavids in the middle of the 15th century led to a new era in Iran. They built an economically robust and politically stable state and thus created a kind of “Iranian Nation-state, “in which the twelve Schia was elevated to the state religion. Shah’Abbas promoted crafts, trade and commerce, reformed the lease and tax system, and unified coinage. This new Shiite kingship, which blended the glories of the ancient Persian rulers with the lineage of the Prophet’s family, is manifested in the visionary master plan of the new capital, Isfahan. With the collapse of the Safawidenreichs power struggles broke out, in which Karim Khan Zand prevailed and Shiraz expanded into a royal residence. The Qajar tribal prince Aqa Mohammed Khan chose Tehran as the Shah residence and capital, which subsequently received a touch of European flair. In the subsequent reign of Pahlavi began the planned industrialization of the country. His son and successor, Mohammad Reza Shah transformed Tehran into a global city with explosive growth in both surface and altitude, not least thanks to the revenues of oil, which has been nationalized since 1951. On January 16, 1979, Mohammed Reza Shah had to flee the country. On February 1, Khomeini landed in Tehran and became the Islamic Republic of Iran.

In the footsteps of Shah Abbas the Great Sunday, March 31 to Sunday, April 14, 2019 By Architectour/Kultour Ferienreisen Ag ​

In March 1598, Shah Abbas traveled from Qazwin to Isfahan to celebrate the Persian New Year. He decided to found his own imperial city on the gardens and fields between the famous city and the shores of Zayandeh-Rud. The master plan of Shah Abbas represents the vision of a new order articulating the concept of royalty on the basis of Twelver Shia and blending the glories of the ancient Persian kings with the legitimacy of the Prophet’s family. We follow the architectural and urban planning conditions that characterize Iran’s political development since the early modern era to the present day.

Educational Trip with ETH Professors & Students “The Resurgence of the Silk Road” cooperation with Th. Meyer-Wieser 18. April_27. April 2019

Individual Tours for the guests of embassies The region of the Silk Road rises again from east to west. One feels slightly confused by the violence in the Islamic world, by religious fundamentalism, by the clashes between America and Iran. What we are experiencing is the birth pangs of a region that once dominated the intellectual, cultural and economic landscape and is now rising again. We see signs that the world’s center of gravity is shifting back to the region where it has lain for millennia. With more than five thousand years of history, Iran can not be squeezed into the now so widespread confrontation of Islamic fundamentalism – Western democracy, where the Christian West and the Islamic Orient seem to be two separate worlds. Such a fundamental separation is unlikely to be justified, for the Orient and Occident are in many ways related. For nearly a millennium, they were closely interwoven politically, economically and culturally in Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine antiquity, and the cultures of subsequent Islam are similarly founded on this classic-ancient legacy as our Occidental Middle Ages. The fact that kinship does not mean equality actually goes without saying.

Iran, Pre-Trip NSL - The Resurgence of the Silk Road April 18 to April 27, 2019 ​

From east to west, the region of the Silk Road rises again. One feels easily confused by the violence in the Islamic world, by religious fundamentalism, by the Clashes between America and Iran. What we are experiencing is the birth pangs of a region that once dominated the intellectual, cultural and economic landscape and now again rises. We see signs that the world’s center of gravity is shifting back to the region where it has lain for millennia. With a history of more than five thousand years, Iran can not be squeezed into the present-day opposition of Islamic fundamentalism-Western democracy, where the Christian West and the Islamic Orient seem to be two different worlds. Such a fundamental separation is hardly justified because the Orient and the Occident are related in many ways. For nearly a millennium, they were closely interwoven politically, economically and culturally in Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine antiquity, and the cultures of subsequent Islam are similarly founded on this classic-ancient legacy as our Occidental Middle Ages. The fact that kinship does not mean equality actually goes without saying.

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